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Psychology and its occult influences

Modern day psychology actually has the occult to thank for its roots. Sigmund Freud, Sándor Ferenczi, and Carl Jung all spent a great deal of time studying the occult and their experiments even involved practice of the occult.

“Freud first became involved with the paranormal in 1905. He published his last paper on the subject in 1932. During the intervening years, both he and some of his colleagues, particularly Carl Jung and Sándor Ferenczi, devoted a great deal of time and energy to the study of the occult.”

Freud played a more of a myth busting role in his interest in the occult. He still remained very open to the possibility that of real paranormal events. Freud was often torn between wanting to believe in something more and realizing it was his own desires and will that made such paranormal events occur. Freud ultimately succumbed to the superstitious belief of numbers believing that his phone number contained the ending age of his mortality. His fear he suggested was not out of aggression but like most out of the hope that there is a hope of immortality.

Before Ferenczi even knew Freud he had already spent much of his time devoted to the study of dreams, occult, and hypnotism. When Ferenczi met Freud, he decided to devote his life to Parapsychology. Their most noted work was to try and perform and prove thought transference or what we know as telepathy. This view of telepathy involved two very emotionally connected individuals. The telepathy or shared thought occurred only during times of great negative emotional impact. This is different than our modern definition of telepathy which involves cogniscent communication via thoughts.

While Freud and Ferenczi took a more active approach in trying to simultaneously disprove or prove occult phenomena Jung took a much more active approach. What many people don’t know is that Carl Jung was actually a very adept practicing gnostic or occultist. Many of his beliefs and views have infiltrated modern psychology. Carl Jung had experienced many bizarre phenomena in his home. Such as doors opening and closing, mysterious voices talking to him etc. The phenomena fit the description of a haunting seemingly perfect. These bizarre occurrences continued until Jung finally sat down in 1916 and wrote The Seven Sermons to the Dead . The book was written under the pen name of Basilides of Alexandria. The book speaks of the creation and of a being named ABRAXAS. When Jung finally completed the Seven Sermons, the bizarre occurrences finally ceased.

The knowledge and study of the subconscious shares very closely with the 72 goetic demons which many occultists now say represent the 72 parts of the lower self. Given the lengthy time all three of these parapsychologists spent vested in the occult and dream psychology, it would be foolish to think that the occult did not influence modern day psychology.

Reference:
* The Gnostic Jung and the Seven Sermons to the Dead
* Freud Studies in Parapsychology

2 Comments

  1. carl jung was a christian and he never claimed to be an occultist. this is what i’ve gathered from his books. i do not think he was what modern times defines as so called “christian”. i do think he was more a mystic than an occultist though. enjoyed the article.

  2. Stephen John says

    Jung was not a Christian..but much of his material has been circulated into the ministries of the more ‘educated’ and found it’s way into ‘Christian Psychology’..a very bad thing in deed…his stuff..and other writings like “The Other Side of Silence” by Kelsey…people need to get educated.

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